Anxiety Disorders

Anxiety

 

Isn't this just an every day thing?

Everyone knows what it is like to feel Anxious - butterflies in your stomach before an exam, feeling tense when someone is angry with you & the way your heart pounds when you're in danger.

It is totally normal and is there to get you ready to face a threatening situation. 

Anxiety is a huge problem when it happens a lot over a long period of time (General Anxiety Disorder), makes being around other people hard (Social Anxiety Disorder) or causes you to have a panic attack.

 

What anxiety feels like


Avoiding school or work, avoiding friends, Feeling more irritated, using more drugs or alcohol, trying too hard to please others, feeling breathless, headaches, shaking, sweating, racing heart

 

General Anxiety Disorder

Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a very common mental health issue. 

You feel extremely anxious for much of the day, on most days, over a long period of time (6 months or more).

The worries can be hard to pinpoint.

 

Social Anxiety Disorder


https://socialanxietyinstitute.org/what-is-social-anxiety

Panic Attacks

Panic Attacks are very common & can be associated with many types of anxiety.

They usually begin in our teenage years but younger people can have them too.

When there are many panic attacks, people may be told they have “Panic Disorder”.  

Panic Attacks are intense feelings & tend to be over within 10 minutes, though sometimes they can last longer.

A person may think that they are dying, having a heart attack, going crazy, or are about to lose control.

 

 Getting help or helping out


You should see your doctor if...  

  • You feel like you cannot control the anxiety
  • The anxiety is very intense or stays around for a long time
  • You start to avoid people or situations (such as school or work)
  • It begins to affect your health or relationships with people you’re close to

You can help out others that you think have anxiety by...

  • Learning their triggers
  • Checking in on them
  • Don't bring up their anxiety often but let them know they can talk to you if needed
  • Make sure they have a support network, not just you alone